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Getting Over the Down Payment Hump

One of the largest barriers to entry into home ownership is saving enough cash for a down payment. Small every day expenses add up; and depending on the market you live in, rent may also be eating a significant portion of your income each month. You do have options; here are some ways you may be able to obtain the funds to put towards a home:

 

Save – Simple. Utilizing a Tax Free Savings Account, determine an amount to save each month that you believe is reasonable yet substantial enough to get you to your down payment goal. Set up automatic transfer into that accounts that line up with payday and bills.

Extra Income – Ever consider a side hustle or second job. Put 100% of this cash flow into your down payment.

Home Buyers Plan – Have money in your RRSP account? The Federal government will allow you to pull up to $35,000 from your RRSP account. Note, you have 15 years to return the funds back into your RRSP account.

Sell and Asset – If you have a valuable asset your willing to give up, sell it! Just make sure to establish a clear paper trail; get a receipt or signed bill of sale to legitimize the source of funds.

The Bank of Mom and Dad – This may or may not be possible. Parent may have built up some equity in their home they can access with a secured line of credit. If this is a gift, a signed gift letter stating so will be needed. If it is to be replayed, the payment must be included in your debt ratios used to qualify.

Utilizing the Equity in Your Home

Having been in your home for some time, steadily paying off you mortgage, you have subsequently been gaining equity. To access it, begins with refinancing. This is likely more accessible and at a lower cost than obtaining a loan not secured by your valuable asset – your home. For the most part, home equity loans and lines of credit hold lower interest rates and you can access up to 80% the appraised value of your home.

 

You can then utilize these funds to make investment with higher returns. You may plan to use the funds to make improvements on your home, increasing the resale price potential. Or you may plan to consolidate excising debt charging you a high interest rate, decreasing your debt load faster and increasing your monthly cash flow. Or you may want to pursue a business opportunity that will increase your future earning potential. The opportunities are plenty!

Refinance Plus Improvement Mortgage

A refinance plus improvements can help you finally complete those home renovations you have always wanted to do! A conventional refinance enables a homeowner to borrow up to 80% of the fair market value of their home.

So, the equity a homeowner can access would be the difference between 80% of market value and the amount they currently owe outstanding on their current mortgage. This equity can be used for improvement on the home. But what if you go out and get estimates for the total cost of the project from a contractor and this isn’t quite enough money for the renovation project?

Well, these improvements also have the added bonus of potentially increasing the value of the home! A Refinance Plus Improvements Mortgage considers the post renovation (higher) value of the home, and allows a homeowner to borrow up to 80% of this increased home value.

Get your hard hats ready, and start renovating today!

Home Equity

Many people find that one of the easiest and most affordable ways to access money is through the equity that they have accumulated in their home. This is a very popular option, especially when you have an excellent first mortgage in place.

Canadians purchase homes for a variety of reasons. Some want the stability of owning their own home, while others also look at home ownership as an investment vehicle. No matter what the reason, the truth is that home ownership has proven itself to be a good stable investment over time, and one which many Canadians are profiting from.

Putting Your Home Equity to Work For You
While many people have chosen to purchase their first home during these times of lower interest rates, there has also been a large movement to refinance home loans and pull out equity for home improvements, investments, college expenses, and even high interest debt consolidation. Canadians have been borrowing against their home’s equity in record numbers, taking out billions of dollars in cash each year.

In years past, many saw their homes as a shelter of safety, yet today, they are more willing to borrow against the equity owned in their homes to further their investment portfolios, get out of debt, send their children to university, make improvements to their home, or even boost their RRSP contributions. Where home equity was once sat upon, today it is often used to one’s advantage.

While removing equity from your home can be a good idea, you should do so with caution and fully understand the benefits and possible risks.

The best thing you can do is to consult a licensed mortgage broker professional and financial planner to discuss opportunities to make your home’s equity work for you.